The low alcohol Woodstar heads for the UK

19 February, 2018

A drink crafted in the Cognac region of France and aimed at adults looking to limit their alcohol consumption, has been launched by a UK company.

Woodstar looks like a wine but is not made from grapes, according to the producer. The drink is made from a complex blend of Amazonian Acai beer, French blackcurrants, other berries, orange blossom honey, botanicals and cocoa, and it is produced using natural spring water from the Cognac region by a fourth generation Cognac maker. It is also just 1% abv and low in calories.

Simon Baldry, one of its founders, said: “Woodstar has character on the nose, lightness in the mouth and a dry finish that suits a sophisticated palate, it actually has more complexity than the average table wine.

“At 1% proof there is no other drink on the market quite like it. Woodstar is all about freedom and choice. It is for people who want to get a lot more out of their day without being impaired, enjoying the company of people who may be drinking alcohol without any sense of being left out or on the outside. It is also a great beverage for anyone who is considering their overall wellness regime.”

Woodstar is named after a tiny hummingbird called the Amethyst Woodstar, which lives in the Amazon rainforest, where the Acai berries grow wild.

The project is a joint venture between two English entrepreneurs Andrew Baker and Simon Baldry and Gilles Merlet, a master Liqoriste, who is described as being highly skilled in blending.

Merlet said: “We go to great lengths to craft such a distinctive drink, with just a hint of alcohol. The process takes a minimum of 12 weeks in our family distillery near Cognac, releasing all of its natural colour and flavour.”

Baldry added: “Woodstar is very much a drink for people who love socialising and enjoying a moment without having to rely on alcohol to impress.”




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