Whisky broker launches rare cask service

10 July, 2017

Analyst and brokering company Rare Whisky 101 has launched a cask supply service to meet global demand from enthusiasts seeking rare whisky still held in wood.

The company has brokered the sale of over 20,000 rare whisky bottles in the past year and believes the market for dormant casks provides a potential lucrative extra string to its bow.

RW101 has already brokered casks from distilleries including Ardbeg, Laphroaig, Macallan, Highland Park, Rosebank and Springbank, collectively containing 13,576 bottles of whisky worth £3.6 million when bottled at cask strength.

Individual prices have ranged from £2,500 per cask to over £500,000, with an average cask price of £132,000.

By announcing the formal launch of the service, RW101 aims to convince owners of casks of rare whisky that are lying dormant in Scotland’s bonded warehouses to liquidate their stocks. 

Company co-founder David Robertson (pictured left) said: “While we have always advised our customers against buying casks filled with new-make spirit, we believe that the market for older casks of high quality liquid from top tier distilleries will continue to go from strength to strength.

“RW101 has already seen an increased demand for quality casks from our more sophisticated clients, be they connoisseurs, collectors or investors so it made sense to introduce a more formal cask brokerage service.

“We’re particularly keen to hear from any cask owners who may have either inherited old casks or acquired and then left them in storage.

“Given the booming global demand for rare whisky, these owners could be sitting on a very tidy profit.”

Robertson said there was a risk in hanging on to casks for too long.

“Many people would assume that as long as their whisky is stored in cask in a bonded warehouse, no harm can come to it,” he said.

“However, that couldn’t be further from the truth. There is most definitely a finite time in which to sell a cask. We recently saw a 50-year-old cask that had dropped below the legal minimum of 40% alcohol to 28% and was subsequently deemed worthless.

“I’d encourage any owners, even if they don’t want to sell, to get their casks regauged and sampled. Casks can also leak and become overly-woody so cask owners should ensure that their casks are checked annually.”




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