MARKET MONITOR A graphic guide to the off-trade

21 September, 2007

Category domination by percentage value sales

The on-trade continues to dominate the picture when it comes to some of the big blockbuster categories, making the off-trade's contribution to beer, cider and imported whiskey look rather puny.

But a closer examination of the Nielsen data reveals a slightly different picture. Prices are dearer in the on-trade to cover its higher cost base, and the figures for sales volume show

the take-home market

doing somewhat better than the sales value chart

suggests.

Take ale. The off-trade only claims 10 per cent of sales, but accounts for 18 per cent of volumes. This anomaly is down to the relative cheapness of beer in the off-trade.

The picture is even more extreme in cider. Bar prices ensure that the on-trade claims 71 per cent of sales value from the sector - yet most cider purchases happen in the off-trade. By volume, the take-home market has a 56 per cent share.

In light wine (that is everything except sparkling, fortified and low-alcohol products), the off-trade is the undisputed winner whichever measure is used. It claims a 61 per cent share of the money spent by British consumers, and 84 per cent of the actual liquid that is sold.




Bookmark this


Site Search

COMMENT

Richard Hemming MW asks: what’s the next step for indies?

In the not-too-distant future, when all humans are born with inbuilt VR headsets and Trump is Supreme Commander of the Known Universe, how will students of wine look back on the present era of retail in the UK? And, in such a dystopian world, why would anyone care?

Click for more »
Upcoming events

Polls

Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know

Facebook

Twitter