Yalumba creates its own definition for vine ages

05 October, 2007

Australia

brand Yalumba has created a charter to define the term "old vine".

In Australia there is no definition in wine law to prescribe what constitutes an old vine, "leaving it open to individual interpretation, or to possible indiscriminate or misleading use", according to Yalumba's owner Robert Hill Smith.

In a bid to stem abuse of the term and in "recognition, preservation and promotion of these old vines", the South Australian wine company has created a four-tier definition.

From this vintage, Yalumba will use the terms "old vine" to describe wines made from vineyards that are at least 25 years old, "antique" (at least 70 years old), "centenarian" (at least 100 years old) and "tri-centenary" (a vine whose life has spanned three centuries).

Smith said he hoped to see other companies adopting Yalumba's charter or developing their own definitions.

Atkin on the case, page 19.




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