Europe relaxes rules on lower alcohol wines

06 November, 2008

The European Union has relaxed its stance on winemakers who take alcohol out of wine during production, in a move which could result in more wines of around 10% alcohol hitting the shelves.

The move has been welcomed by the Wine & Spirit Trade Association, which has campaigned for 18 months to persuade Europe to change its position.

Previously, winemakers in France and Spain were allowed to use reverse osmosis or spinning cone devices to reduce alcoholic strength by up to two percentage points – but the wines could not be exported. US winemakers were the only ones allowed to sell wines in Europe which had been reduced in alcoholic strength.

Jeremy Beadles, chief executive of the WSTA, said: “We are delighted that the European Commission has changed the rules to allow producers and retailers the opportunity to offer customers a wider range of reduced alcohol wines.

“Customers have been saying for some time that they want more choice and these rule changes should allow the industry to meet that demand.”

The ruling comes into force this month and carries a number of conditions – the use of the experimental practice must be noted on both the accompanying documentation and winemaking records. The European Commission must be notified of the product and process used.




Bookmark this


Site Search

COMMENT

Lifting the spirits

I were to sum up alcohol sales over Christmas 2017 in one word, it would be “gin”. At Nielsen, we define the Christmas period as the 12 weeks to December 30 and in that time gin sales were £199.4 million, which means they increased by £55.4 million compared with Christmas 2016. There’s no sign the bubble is about to burst either. Growth at Christmas 2016 was £22.4 million, so gin has increased its value growth nearly two-and-a-half times in a year. The spirit added more value to
total a

Click for more »
Upcoming events

Polls

Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know

Facebook

Twitter