Alcohol spending rises 21% over two decades

15 July, 2009

British people are buying 21% more alcohol than they were two decades ago, according to government figures.

In 1986-87, con

sumers purchased 9.53 litres of pure alcohol per adult – which works out at an average of 2.6 units every day.

In 2007-08, the most recent year for which statistics are available, Britons each bought an average of 11.53 litres of pure alcohol. That equates to 3.1 units a day.

Government guidelines recommend a maximum of three to four units a day for men and two to three units a day for women.

The 2007-8 figure is lower than the totals recorded between 2003-04 and 2005-06. In those years, alcohol purchasing stood at 11.7 litres, 11.78 litres and 11.54 litres respectively.

The data was produced by HM Revenue & Customs and quoted this week by the Department of Health in response to a Parliamentary question.




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COMMENT

Lifting the spirits

I were to sum up alcohol sales over Christmas 2017 in one word, it would be “gin”. At Nielsen, we define the Christmas period as the 12 weeks to December 30 and in that time gin sales were £199.4 million, which means they increased by £55.4 million compared with Christmas 2016. There’s no sign the bubble is about to burst either. Growth at Christmas 2016 was £22.4 million, so gin has increased its value growth nearly two-and-a-half times in a year. The spirit added more value to
total a

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