Moral high ground is wrong place for Thresher head buyer
Published:  01 June, 2007

I nearly choked on my vinegar-like glass of Hardy's Arrival Cab Sauv (now three for two at Threshers) when I read the comments of our head buyer, Jonathan Butt (OLN, May 18).

"People are bored with the offering of the New World - disappointed with the quality that they are getting via places like Australia. The way it fills the market with cheap, bad or poor-quality wine will come back to haunt them. The Old World has not prostituted itself to the whims of BOGOFs and chasing market share."

Could I just check that Mr Butt and I share a common employer

and that he hasn't been working for Berry Bros for the past few years?

The same company which has imposed a quality-free wine planogram on my store, consisting almost entirely of big brands

such as Blossom Hill, Jacob's Creek, Banrock Station and Kumala.

The same company that effectively signed a pact with the irony devil when it arranged for Gallo (Gallo!) to be responsible for our wine training.

For years,

The Thresher Group has been synonymous with promo-driven retailing on wines of dubious quality. I feel that Mr Butt should remember this before claiming the moral high ground.

Yours, expecting a P45.

Haddows branch manager




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